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on audiovisual translation, subtitling, and the French & American film industries

Film Finance Update

Last week’s Beverly Hills Bar Association film finance seminar laid out the landscape for indie film finance, and the news . . . was not as bad as some might expect.

While certain elements–like investment funding–are lagging, soft money in the form of state film credits  and crowdsourcing are quite steady, depending on the location involved.   Most of the panel felt slate financing and pre-sales are definitively gone, but (legitimate) hedge funds have actually made a comeback, driven by American equity.

Without slates or cherry-picking therein, financing tends to be more random.  The types of content are unlimited though, excepting westerns and musicals, the province of studios.  But trustworthy sales agents are also key as structural differences aside,  little has changed from 2007 in terms of quality content and professional relationships holding sway.

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Filed under: audiovisual translation, French film industry, US film industry, , , , , ,

Personal Sidebar: ‘Any Day Now’

Garret Dillahunt and Alan Cumming in "Any Day Now"As awards season starts in earnest, this is possibly the best movie most people won’t see.  Because it’s an honest and vivid LGBT filmidiotically rated “R” as if to equate gay male sexuality with extreme violence (more than entire blog’s worth of suggestive content, that)–made with a miniscule budget, and has a timely, heartfelt story with no tentpoley gimmicks.

This terrific, warm and entertaining movie, though it miraculously escaped direct-to-Netflix obscurity, is nevertheless bound for nowhere, fame-wise.  That is, unless people take notice, and more importantly award voters and related trendalistas (OK I just made that word up, in English anyway).

Even major talent is venting about the dearth of risky, story-driven content.  Can the day be far off when, like winter and unextreme weather, human and humane films are something from another era?

Filed under: divers, US film industry, , , ,

The Trouble with “Globish”

Perhaps because I’m a) a French translator, b) getting older, and/or c) ever less culturally pliable, non-native English speakers professing linguistic skill or expertise they don’t have neutralize my patience like no one else.  Anyone who’s spent any time on a customer service line lately will understand perfectly.

Accordingly, my curiosity was piqued by an article in the current ATA Chronicle by Jeana Clark and Esma A. Gregor on “Globish,” or “Global English.”  Most Chronicle articles seesaw/skew between the academic and the technical, and while their logic only jumps one shark (whose household familarity with Globish?), the authors have made a thorough presentation of something native speakers often experience as a linguistic APM.

Unfortunately, being messengers (like me) in the endless skirmish that is language, Clark and Gregor pussy foot around taking stakes for either “side” linguistically.   For instance , is this the death knell for the English we know and (love? hate? despise? tolerate? endlessly mangle?)  (Happily I’m not the first person to rhyme Globish with rubbish.)  Is it a linguistic mutation more zombie than real?

Professionally, when clients and editors alike resort to it through ignorance or inexperience, I find Euro English the most exasperating manifestation.  At the end of the day (the business one, anyway), this all reminds me (and hopefully my clients!) that it’s essential to pay a professional when an amateur only creates more confusion.

Filed under: divers, translation, , , , , , , , ,