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on audiovisual translation, subtitling, and the French & American film industries

At the Beginning . . . Reaching the End (For Now)

With some regret but great relief, I’ve decided to set this aside blog for now, and heartily encourage my “readership” and “followers” to join me a my two new blogs, started last summer.

One covers my preoccupations with all things economic related to daily life, the other the presence and more often lack thereof, of gay men in film and TV.

In the future, I hope to bring French and/or francophile/phone film professionals here in Los Angeles for potential vlog discussions about audiovisual translation.

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Filed under: French film industry, French translation, translation, US film industry, ,

Actors as Translators (and Interpreters)

Kristin Scott Thomas

Another testament that so much is knitting our world closer; this lovely article only confirms what I’ve noticed for some time.

By necessity, national film market borders are disappearing faster than polar ice floes.  But as formats get smaller and more personalized, and guaranteeing revenue trickier, consolidation is even more critical, all in a search for more “green.”

And along the way to all of that, I’m really happy to see Kristin Scott-Thomas getting much deserved critical attention for the wonderful work she does and has done.

Filed under: audiovisual translation, divers, French film industry, French translation, US film industry, , ,

Film Finance Update

Last week’s Beverly Hills Bar Association film finance seminar laid out the landscape for indie film finance, and the news . . . was not as bad as some might expect.

While certain elements–like investment funding–are lagging, soft money in the form of state film credits  and crowdsourcing are quite steady, depending on the location involved.   Most of the panel felt slate financing and pre-sales are definitively gone, but (legitimate) hedge funds have actually made a comeback, driven by American equity.

Without slates or cherry-picking therein, financing tends to be more random.  The types of content are unlimited though, excepting westerns and musicals, the province of studios.  But trustworthy sales agents are also key as structural differences aside,  little has changed from 2007 in terms of quality content and professional relationships holding sway.

Filed under: audiovisual translation, French film industry, US film industry, , , , , ,

Personal Sidebar: ‘Any Day Now’

Garret Dillahunt and Alan Cumming in "Any Day Now"As awards season starts in earnest, this is possibly the best movie most people won’t see.  Because it’s an honest and vivid LGBT filmidiotically rated “R” as if to equate gay male sexuality with extreme violence (more than entire blog’s worth of suggestive content, that)–made with a miniscule budget, and has a timely, heartfelt story with no tentpoley gimmicks.

This terrific, warm and entertaining movie, though it miraculously escaped direct-to-Netflix obscurity, is nevertheless bound for nowhere, fame-wise.  That is, unless people take notice, and more importantly award voters and related trendalistas (OK I just made that word up, in English anyway).

Even major talent is venting about the dearth of risky, story-driven content.  Can the day be far off when, like winter and unextreme weather, human and humane films are something from another era?

Filed under: divers, US film industry, , , ,

‘The Artist’ and Hollywood: What’s It All About, Uggie?

Before the internet, tweeting, and instant messaging, Oscar season sometimes lasted till . . . April!  By way of explaining my consideration of The Artist‘s sweep at last February’s awards.

Consistent with previous observations, this only confirms Hollywood’s coming out à la française not merely as an international marketplace, but more critically a berth for foreign product.  As heinous and Darwinistic Thomas Friedman’s thesis is, the world relentlessly continues to flatten as if in some Ayn Rand/L. Ron Hubbard nightmare scenario.

But instead of the nostalgic look back as most observers have framed it, I think Academy members and perhaps Hollywood generally is in the midst of a ‘media-forward’ conversion.  With the internet tolling the end of so very much–scheduled television, celluloid prints, the preciousness of audiovisual production itself–all at once, no wonder in waving an utterly unsentimental goodbye to a kind of Hollywood that’s increasingly hard to justify, it would seem as if the industry is not only recognizing the rest of the world in ways it rarely has before, but embracing it.

Filed under: audiovisual translation, French film industry, French translation, US film industry, , , , ,

And the César goes to –

While one of the more unpredictable award competitions in years unfolds here, the Césars will occur in parallel, making me wonder if the symetric calendar (César reveals himself two days before Oscar) could portend anything on the latter, ahem?

What looks like a fictionally framed look at French child protective services garnered thirteen nods, followed by a political drama concerning a government official with 11, and finally that black & white silent film with a dog at ten (same number of nominations as Intouchables).

Taking a page from Jean Dujardin at the SAG awards last night, bonne chance et à bientôt à tous et toutes!

Filed under: divers, French film industry, US film industry, , , , , , ,

On the Horizon . . .

It’s rare to hear about a French film that’s both socially conscious and wildly successful, but Intouchables is just that.  It’s scheduled to be released stateside early this coming year, and will be interesting to see how this racially-based comedy fares here.

Filed under: French film industry, US film industry,

The Real Deal

Anyone who has already seen or plans to see Martin Scorsese‘s wonderful new film should check out this website for more on Méliès.  The character of René Tabard is entirely fictitious – but possibly the definitive work on him (which I happen to own) was actually written by his granddaughter.

I plan to see the film again – appropriately, in all respects, in 3D!

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Tintin vient!

I was vaguely aware of this series in high school, but like most Americans oblivious to it for most of my life.  Until now (or at least in theaters come December.)

The film, thanks to Steven Spielberg and Peter Jackson, has already hit Europe, and the reaction, certainly in France, has been understandably qualified.

Filed under: French film industry, translation, US film industry, , , ,

Two to Watch Out For

I was delighted to see Dany Boon’s new film the other night, which on the one hand is a send up of our overly partisan yet constantly shifting world, and on the other an attempt to recreate the gargantuan success of his first film.

There’s talk of a remake (after Will Smith snapped up the rights for his earlier film), and it’s intriguing to imagine where they would base the comedy if transplanted here.  Canadian border comedy was long-ago exhausted by SCTV, and demographic-based humor can be tricky these days.

Otherwise, I was on-set last fall across the soundstage where this other film (itself reflective of  previous posts of mine about the ever increasing internationality of film production) was being filmed here in Los Angeles.  “Droid” or “avatar”, it looks like fun, and certainly an homage to American films from that time with a definite French touch.

Filed under: audiovisual translation, French film industry, US film industry, , , , ,